Join my mailing list to receive inspirational updates AND  20% off your first purchase 

Rebanada De Vida

Price:

Size: 30x40

Original is 30x40, textured Acrylic

Inspired by my Mexico trip and the countless watermelon (“Sandia” in Spanish) paintings I saw growing up in a border town, this creation brought up deeper curiosities on the connection between the “watermelon muse” and Mexican culture. Frida Kahlo’s piece “Viva la Vida” (translation “Live Life”) sums it up pretty well. When I compare the qualities of a watermelon to Mexico’s culture, I can feel the similarities. To me, watermelon’s juiciness represents a sort of indulgence, a delicious (even sexy) way to satiate the soul. I also love that watermelons are a fruit so big that once cut open, it’s best to share with friends and family. Mexican culture is so full of festivities, family bonding, friendliness, and generosity.

On a more personal note, I happen to be on my second year of growing delicious watermelons in my garden! As it goes, the outer world influences the inner world and thus the watermelon has entered my creative consciousness. The watermelon mandala pattern behind the figure is a visual way of demonstrating how the patterns of the world around us shape the pathways (or patterns) in our minds, and thus can also alter our physical realities.  The more obvious, unopened watermelon is an example of the “physical reality” as we know it, or as we see it. This painting itself is another example of the way the subconscious, influenced by its outer environments, is able to manifest physically.

see full description & specifications

My approach to this creation was an act of letting go of “perfection.” I started the sketch on an airplane ride back from Mexico City. Each turbulent bump led to a perfectly unplanned squiggle. I let my subconscious bleed ink onto paper placed on a small airplane meal tray, plastic cup of wine by its side.  There was an energy to it, the type of energy that is only available when releasing the steady hand and opening the rigid mind.

After landing and returning to my cabin, I felt eager to pull out my sketch pad and create another quick, imperfect sketch while she/he was still in my mind and while my unpacked bags still carried with them the spirit of Mexico. The patterned blouse on this painted goddess was inspired by a hand-sewn top I bought on my travels. I framed the sketch and thought (for a second) maybe this would be the extent of that vision, but nope. She wanted to be bigger, deeper, and to have more of my attention. And so…

“What canvas should she go on?” I wondered.

I went to the shed and flipped through some fresh new canvases uninspired until I found a “poop brown” canvas. “Oh ya…this one.” The memory of my 24th birthday (almost a decade before) ran back to me. I had an art jam with a collaborative canvas for all to paint on. Each person contributed their magic and at the end of the night, a woman (who I did not know) decided to take her hands and smear all the paints on the pallet together. This, my friends, makes the color “Poop Brown!”;).  She proceeded to glide her globby hands around the canvas, leaving chunks of paint in places and lightly covering the under layers almost everywhere. It’s funny (depending on who you ask), but at that moment, I just let it be. I truly had zero attachment to how that piece turned out, it wasn’t actually “mine”.  In a way, it was simply a group experiment, and this is how it turned out.

Anyway, fast forward to me digging through my shed searching for the “imperfectly” perfect canvas. This one, full of texture, was the “perfect” way to make it impossible for me to get perfect lines and thus, would force me to let go, how ironic is that!?!? I took the poopy canvas into my cabin and began to pour primer on it. Standing above it I dripped the primer straight from the jar like a 4-year old having the time of her life with no thoughts of mess or clean up. It added extra perfectly uncalculated texture for the layers to come.

Beyond my relationship with Mexican culture, re-sparked by my Mexico City trip, this piece is quite cross-cultural; I may even go as far to say multi-dimensional! I, myself, am still processing the rich symbolism between each layer but will do my best to highlight some of the cultural references embedded in this creation. The forward-facing hands are reminiscent of the Hamsa Hand, which is an ancient Middle Eastern amulet symbolizing the Hand of God. In all faiths, it is a protective sign and brings forward happiness, luck, and good health. Being a fan of the #3, (and triangles in general) I like how the added eye on the bottom hand brings 3 eyes into the painting, and in the same fashion, the lower hand holding the watermelon brings in three hands. On topic, the centerpiece on the blouse has an upward and downward facing triangle, pointing to heaven and earth. This also brings in my “womb wisdom” logo, which might as well be my “signature” in this piece. J Other cultural references include the Aztec, maze pattern and the southwestern beadwork and design of the shape over her heart. There’s an ancient Mesoamerican feel to this piece, as well as a Navajo color scheme and vibe (love me some turquoise). Though still a vibrant piece, I dulled it down a bit by smearing (unevenly) a watered-down light brown paint over the top to give it a sort of worn down and timeless feel. Living out in the woods, I have come to appreciate the fact that dirt gets on everything, and now find it to be a beauty-full aesthetic.

Her eyes are piercing, wise and somehow young all at the same time. Painting this at a time where the world as we know it was/is crumbling, waves of stress, joy, confusion, and surrender entered the strokes of my bush variably in each session. Her eyes say it all. Needless to say, she was my therapy and my anchor and, in a way, as the Hamsa Hand represents she was my protector. It was a long, slow process working on her. Pattern by pattern, layer by layer, color by changing color… she came to be. Now, when I stare at her my eyes float around the canvas with pride and even more curiosity. It feels strange to claim I’ve ‘created’ this painting, when really it was more like the spirit of this piece wanted to come through.


As a whole, I love how both the actual texture and the perceived texture, through the patterns and dry brushwork, make this creation feel (to the eye) like a tapestry, yet again giving it a more indigenous atmosphere. She taught and shaped me while I painted her. For this, I’m grateful and really look forward to exploring this color pallet and approach further.

Rebanada De Vida

Inspired by my Mexico trip and the countless watermelon (“Sandia” in Spanish) paintings I saw growing up in a border town, this creation brought up deeper curiosities on the connection between the “watermelon muse” and Mexican culture. Frida Kahlo’s piece “Viva la Vida” (translation “Live Life”) sums it up pretty well. When I compare the qualities of a watermelon to Mexico’s culture, I can feel the similarities. To me, watermelon’s juiciness represents a sort of indulgence, a delicious (even sexy) way to satiate the soul. I also love that watermelons are a fruit so big that once cut open, it’s best to share with friends and family. Mexican culture is so full of festivities, family bonding, friendliness, and generosity.

On a more personal note, I happen to be on my second year of growing delicious watermelons in my garden! As it goes, the outer world influences the inner world and thus the watermelon has entered my creative consciousness. The watermelon mandala pattern behind the figure is a visual way of demonstrating how the patterns of the world around us shape the pathways (or patterns) in our minds, and thus can also alter our physical realities.  The more obvious, unopened watermelon is an example of the “physical reality” as we know it, or as we see it. This painting itself is another example of the way the subconscious, influenced by its outer environments, is able to manifest physically.

see full description & specifications

My approach to this creation was an act of letting go of “perfection.” I started the sketch on an airplane ride back from Mexico City. Each turbulent bump led to a perfectly unplanned squiggle. I let my subconscious bleed ink onto paper placed on a small airplane meal tray, plastic cup of wine by its side.  There was an energy to it, the type of energy that is only available when releasing the steady hand and opening the rigid mind.

After landing and returning to my cabin, I felt eager to pull out my sketch pad and create another quick, imperfect sketch while she/he was still in my mind and while my unpacked bags still carried with them the spirit of Mexico. The patterned blouse on this painted goddess was inspired by a hand-sewn top I bought on my travels. I framed the sketch and thought (for a second) maybe this would be the extent of that vision, but nope. She wanted to be bigger, deeper, and to have more of my attention. And so…

“What canvas should she go on?” I wondered.

I went to the shed and flipped through some fresh new canvases uninspired until I found a “poop brown” canvas. “Oh ya…this one.” The memory of my 24th birthday (almost a decade before) ran back to me. I had an art jam with a collaborative canvas for all to paint on. Each person contributed their magic and at the end of the night, a woman (who I did not know) decided to take her hands and smear all the paints on the pallet together. This, my friends, makes the color “Poop Brown!”;).  She proceeded to glide her globby hands around the canvas, leaving chunks of paint in places and lightly covering the under layers almost everywhere. It’s funny (depending on who you ask), but at that moment, I just let it be. I truly had zero attachment to how that piece turned out, it wasn’t actually “mine”.  In a way, it was simply a group experiment, and this is how it turned out.

Anyway, fast forward to me digging through my shed searching for the “imperfectly” perfect canvas. This one, full of texture, was the “perfect” way to make it impossible for me to get perfect lines and thus, would force me to let go, how ironic is that!?!? I took the poopy canvas into my cabin and began to pour primer on it. Standing above it I dripped the primer straight from the jar like a 4-year old having the time of her life with no thoughts of mess or clean up. It added extra perfectly uncalculated texture for the layers to come.

Beyond my relationship with Mexican culture, re-sparked by my Mexico City trip, this piece is quite cross-cultural; I may even go as far as to say multi-dimensional! I, myself, am still processing the rich symbolism between each layer but will do my best to highlight some of the cultural references embedded in this creation. The forward-facing hands are reminiscent of the Hamsa Hand, which is an ancient Middle Eastern amulet symbolizing the Hand of God. In all faiths it is a protective sign and brings forward happiness, luck, and good health. Being a fan of the # 3, (and triangles in general) I like how the added eye on the bottom hand brings 3 eyes into the painting, and in the same fashion, the lower hand holding the watermelon brings in three hands. On topic, the centerpiece on the blouse has an upward and downward facing triangle, pointing to heaven and earth. This also brings in my “womb wisdom” logo, which might as well be my “signature” in this piece. J Other cultural references include the Aztec, maze pattern, and the southwestern beadwork and design of the shape over her heart. There’s an ancient Mesoamerican feel to this piece, as well as a Navajo color scheme and vibe (love me some turquoise). Though still a vibrant piece, I dulled it down a bit by smearing (unevenly) a watered-down light brown paint over the top to give it a sort of worn down and timeless feel. Living out in the woods, I have come to appreciate the fact that dirt gets on everything, and now find it to be a beauty-full aesthetic.

Her eyes are piercing, wise and somehow young all at the same time. Painting this at a time where the world as we know it was/is crumbling, waves of stress, joy, confusion, and surrender entered the strokes of my bush variably in each session. Her eyes say it all. Needless to say, she was my therapy and my anchor and, in a way, as the Hamsa Hand represents she was my protector. It was a long, slow process working on her. Pattern by pattern, layer by layer, color by changing color… she came to be. Now, when I stare at her my eyes float around the canvas with pride and even more curiosity. It feels strange to claim I’ve ‘created’ this painting, when really it was more like the spirit of this piece wanted to come through.


As a whole, I love how both the actual texture and the perceived texture, through the patterns and dry brushwork, make this creation feel (to the eye) like a tapestry, yet again giving it a more indigenous atmosphere. She taught and shaped me while I painted her. For this, I’m grateful and really look forward to exploring this color pallet and approach further.
 

Medium

Size

Styles

Frame

Summary

Add a Message
Quantity
$
Back

Rebanada De Vida

1c crunched snajej

Trusted Art Seller

The presence of this badge signifies that this business has officially registered with the Art Storefronts Organization and has an established track record of selling art.

It also means that buyers can trust that they are buying from a legitimate business. Art sellers that conduct fraudulent activity or that receive numerous complaints from buyers will have this badge revoked. If you would like to file a complaint about this seller, please do so here.

2b crunched ctmrym

Verified Returns & Exchanges

The Art Storefronts Organization has verified that this business has provided a returns & exchanges policy for all art purchases.

Description of Policy from Merchant:

Returns or exchanges are possible if your item shows up damaged or is not the item that you ordered in your original online purchase. To request a return/exchange, please email info@artbyadelaide.com with your order number and a picture of the product.  Returns must be requested within 30 days of purchase date.

3c crunched udpkob

Verified Secure Website with Safe Checkout

This website provides a secure checkout with SSL encryption.

ASF logo Proud Member of Art Storefronts
Cart

Your cart is currently empty.

Saved Successfully.

This is only visible to you because you are logged in and are authorized to manage this website. This message is not visible to other website visitors.

×

Import From Instagram

Click on any Image to continue

Create a New Favorite List

×
Name

Badge ar compatible

The above preview shows how to use the live preview on this website. The image displayed is just an example, and is not available for sale.

Badge ar compatible

This Website Supports Augmented Reality to Live Preview Art

This means you can use the camera on your phone or tablet and superimpose any piece of art onto a wall inside of your home or business.

To use this feature, Just look for the "Live Preview AR" button when viewing any piece of art on this website!

For proper scaling, stand 10 feet away from the wall.
You can also drag the image to your desired location.

It looks like your camera paused.

That's ok. All you need to do is refresh the page to get it working again.

Refresh this Page >>

In some cases, you may need to close and restart your browser, or restart your device to get your camera working again with your browser.

×

The Live Preview feature requires a modern browser that supports the ability to launch a camera from within a browser. If you believe that your device supports that functionality, you may just need to reload this page to let the browser try to activate your camera again.

The ability to activate your camera in a browser is currently supported by Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox, and Opera, in both their desktop and Android versions. It is supported by Apple's Safari browser, version 11 and higher. Microsoft’s Internet Explorer has yet to add support for this functionality.

If you cannot get this working, we recommend emailing a link to a compatible device or just use the
Wall Preview Tool >>

×

You must use the Safari browser to use this feature.

The Live Preview feature requires a modern browser that supports the ability to launch a camera from within a browser. Currently, Apple only allows this functionality to occur within the Safari browser. It may allow Chrome and others in the future.

Please open your Safari browser, visit this page again, and you'll be good to go!

×

You are trying to load your camera within an app (i.e. Facebook, Instagram app) and this particular app won't let you do it!

All you need to do is open a browser (i.e. Safari, Chrome, Firefox) on your device, and then open this page on that browser.

×

You need to try another browser to use this feature.

The Live Preview feature requires a browser that supports the ability to launch a rear camera from within a browser.

Please open another browser (Firefox or default), visit this page again, and you'll be good to go!

×

For proper scaling, stand 10 feet away from the wall.
You can also drag the image to your desired location.

It looks like your camera paused.

That's ok. All you need to do is refresh the page to get it working again.

Refresh this Page >>

In some cases, you may need to close and restart your browser, or restart your device to get your camera working again with your browser.

×

The Live Preview feature requires a modern browser that supports the ability to launch a camera from within a browser. If you believe that your device supports that functionality, you may just need to reload this page to let the browser try to activate your camera again.

The ability to activate your camera in a browser is currently supported by Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox, and Opera, in both their desktop and Android versions. It is supported by Apple's Safari browser, version 11 and higher. Microsoft’s Internet Explorer has yet to add support for this functionality.

If you cannot get this working, we recommend emailing a link to a compatible device or just use the
Wall Preview Tool >>

×

You must use the Safari browser to use this feature.

The Live Preview feature requires a modern browser that supports the ability to launch a camera from within a browser. Currently, Apple only allows this functionality to occur within the Safari browser. It may allow Chrome and others in the future.

Please open your Safari browser, visit this page again, and you'll be good to go!

×

You are trying to load your camera within an app (i.e. Facebook, Instagram app) and this particular app won't let you do it!

All you need to do is open a browser (i.e. Safari, Chrome, Firefox) on your device, and then open this page on that browser.

×

You need to try another browser to use this feature.

The Live Preview feature requires a browser that supports the ability to launch a rear camera from within a browser.

Please open another browser (Firefox or default), visit this page again, and you'll be good to go!

×
×

Email this Image to Your Friends

(this will be the "from" email)
(enter recipient email addresses)
×

Manage Favorites

Below, select which favorite lists you would like to save this product into.

+

Yes Please, Inspire Me!

 20% OFF for FIRST-time Art Purchase

Enter your email to receive inspirational updates and receive your Coupon!

= required

This special and will expire.

Registered business Verified Returns & Exchanges Ssl Encrypted